I’ve been shocked, I’ve laughed and I’ve cried … As you write one can never truely know how others are feeling, but with this book you shed a little light for all of us at what has made you the amazing woman that you are today. Your book makes me appreciate my priviliged upbringing even more.

Julie L. L. Kofoed, M.Sc. (RA), Vallensbæk, Denmark

foredrag for offentligt ansatte

Dandelion Child in flower’ is a very brave and important book. It addresses some of the taboos we still have left the community in Denmark from a personal perspective. It also includes the story of a child – and later young woman – who was repeatedly let down by family, friends, lovers and authorities at an alarming rate…

Gitte Cannon, Assistant Professor, MSc., Randers, Denmark

… It is uplifting to read Tina’s own ways of compensating for the lack of help that she and her family were given. Cases like Tina’s, unfortunately, often tend to be ignored. I hope that others in similar situations will be able to use Tina’s experiences to spot solutions or opportunities they might not even know existed. I would definitely recommend the book to other professionals, to dandelion children and to their families.

Emma Ehlers Nielsen, Psychologist, Dandelion Centre, Nuuk, Greenland

.It’s all about self-awareness, stubborn resilience, an insistence on life – and yes, a belief in profound love…Be ready to smile, cry and shudder with Tina. To wonder – be relieved, shocked, touched, but most of all to rejoice sincerely in all that is possible in life, against all odds.

Elin Nielsen, Explicit, Aalborg, Denmark

Description

 

A dandelion always finds its way to the sun’s rays. It then breaks its way through the asphalt.
Asphalt has been a thick layer of Tina ML Campbell’s life. Moreover, if anyone has been able to break through it, she has. You can never run away from your childhood, but you can be determined not til let it rule your entire life. Nevertheless, what do you do it if the hand life has dealt you consists of: an alcoholic and manipulative father and a disabled mother, who fails to give support to her children. How do you get something good out of life when it started with failure, loneliness, and exploitation – and even landed you with a debilitating and painful rheumatic disease? It sounds like an impossible task. It’s all about self-awareness, stubborn resilience, an insistence on life – and yes, a belief in profound love.

Be ready to smile, cry and shudder with Tina. To wonder – be relieved, shocked, touched, but most of all to rejoice sincerely in all that is possible in life, against all odds.”
Elin Nielsen, Explicit

Book reviews

“Dear Tina,
As you know, I’ve been circling your book since you sent it to me. I’ve had to ‘pull myself together’ to read it. Partly because I knew it would be a tough read, and partly because I thought you deserved a proper review of the book when I did read it, with the many years of work that went into it. So here goes 🙂
I’ve been shocked, I’ve laughed and I’ve cried (and I do understand that your psycologist cried, even if it was totally unprofessional of her).
As you write one can never truely know how others are feeling, but with this book you shed a little light for all of us at what has made you the amazing woman that you are today.
Your book makes me appreciate my priviliged upbringing even more. When I represent FNUG (The Danish Association of Young People with Rheumatism) towards politicians across the country, I always say that I’m doing it for those young (RA) patients who have not had, and are not as priviliged in their upbringing as I have been. Those who do not have the backup I’m still blessed with even though I’m no longer a child. With this book you underline who ‘those’ are.
Your description of the community in FNUG, and what the meeting of so many different people there has done for you, reflects the feeling I’ve experienced myself. You (and others) where role models for me when I first joined FNUG.
Your book shows a great stamina that has brought you to where you are today, and to quote yourself: “It is a truly strong person, that understand how to use his/hers competences” (english translation by me) – it is safe to say that you have managed this – against all odds.
To finish off I just want to thank you for sharing your story. I hope and believe that it can be an inspiration for many others.”

Julie L. L. Kofoed, M.Sc. (RA)

 

“’Dandelion Child in flower’ is a very brave and important book. It addresses some of the taboos we still have left the community in Denmark from a personal perspective. It also includes the story of a child – and later young woman – who was repeatedly let down by family, friends, lovers and authorities at an alarming rate. The utter and complete disrespect Tina Marie-Louise Campbell has met in her life leaves the reader stunned. Nevertheless, Tina Marie-Louise Campbell’s will to live and happiness helps her repeatedly to overcome what no one should be exposed to. Therefore, the book is also very much a story of personal development and personal strength. Tina Marie-Louise Campbell writes well – without bitterness and self-pity, in a candid and unequivocal language. The messages are so important that the book should be read by a large audience. It is tough, edifying and life-affirming reading, and I give the book my warmest recommendations!”

Gitte Cannon, Assistant Professor, MSc.

“An uplifting and interesting book. You can really feel that it has been important for Tina to write it, though at first it was not meant for publication There is no doubt that the book will be an inspiration to many different readers: to people who have experienced difficulties in their past, to others, who have one or more disabilities, to caregivers and to professionals. As a professional, it is certainly very motivating to read how with all the experiences she has had and the adversity she has ever met with, Tina has still managed to get to the point where she is today. It is good to be reminded that everyone, regardless of his or her background, has hidden strengths, some more than others, and that these should not be ignored in one’s work as a professional. Weaknesses and problems are often easier to spot, but they can also create a negative attitude towards people who, in one way or another, come in contact with the health system. It is uplifting to read Tina’s own ways of compensating for the lack of help that she and her family were given. Cases like Tina’s, unfortunately, often tend to be ignored. I hope that others in similar situations will be able to use Tina’s experiences to spot solutions or opportunities they might not even know existed. I would definitely recommend the book to other professionals, to dandelion children and to their families.”

Emma Ehlers Nielsen, Psychologist, Dandelion Centre, Nuuk, Greenland

Print Friendly, PDF & Email